PITTSBURGH ROBBERY DEFENSE ATTORNEY

HOW IS THE CRIME OF ROBBERY DEFINED IN PENNSYLVANIA?

Section 3701 defines robbery under varying circumstances, but the common element to all the circumstances is “in the course of committing a theft.” The varying circumstances are these:

  • Inflicting serious bodily injury upon another
  • Threatening another with or intentionally putting them in fear of immediate serious bodily injury
  • Commits or threatens immediately to commit any felony of the first or second degree
  • Inflicts bodily injury upon another or threatens another with or intentionally puts him in fear of immediate bodily injury
  • Physically takes or removes property from the person of another by force however slight
  • Takes or removes money from a financial institution, without permission, by making a demand of a financial-institution employee either orally or in writing, with the intent to deprive

WHAT DOES “IN THE COURSE OF COMMITTING A THEFT” MEAN?

An act is deemed “in the course of committing a theft” if it occurs in an attempt to commit theft or in flight after the attempt or commission.

HOW SERIOUS IS ROBBERY?

Robbery is a felony offense, and it’s generally graded as a first-degree felony. It’s a second-degree felony under circumstances where bodily injury has been inflicted, immediate bodily injury has been threatened, or under the circumstances involving a financial institution.  It’s a third-degree felony under circumstances where there’s a physical taking of property by force however slight.

WHAT IS THE STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS?

A prosecution for robbery must be commenced within five years after it is committed.

 

If you or a loved one is charged with robbery, call Pittsburgh criminal defense attorney, Ryan H. James, who has tried and argued these cases.  Attorney James can be personally reached at 412-977-1827, or by e-mail at ryan@rhjameslaw.com